Wildflower Windows

In April, the Sweet Pea Embroidery design company had their “KISS” – Keep it Simple Sew along challenge. The offered pattern is discounted during the sew along to participants. There is a deadline to submit your finished project photo on the Facebook group. The pattern was called Wildflower Window Cushion and was available for hoops from 4×4 to 8×8. I chose to stitch out the 8×8 blocks. I used my Janome 11000 to do all the stitching.

The block pictured below has so much texture in the embroidery and lots of thread changes too. The white background, and the batik green around it are supposed to be the window pane and frame.

working on all the steps

Once it comes out of the hoop, you trim the stabilizer back to the outer stitching line. After that is done, you trim the frame to 1/2 inch from the stitching. This gives you good seam allowance without so much bulk. During the stitchout, the batting is trimmed back as well.

There are 40,243 stitches in this block and my machine shows that the time it should take, at 600 stitches per minute was 114 minutes. That doesn’t account for the time for thread changes, trimming etc. I figure it took me about 3 hours.

FIRST block finished
Ready to trim
trimmed up block
All trimmed up

I decided to go “scrappy with my window frames”, using some batiks from the scrap drawer.

Another block finished
Block 2 with the red poppy

The blocks with the applique like the red poppy didn’t take as long to stitch. I layered a tulle over the fabric for the flower on the left, and it added a shimmer and dimension to the flower.

I was on a pretty good roll by the time I got to the 3rd block. It was another applique block so it went pretty fast.

growing some flowers
Block 1 Wildflower Window Cushion
46,403 stitches – machine time 130 minutes – 17 thread changes

Once everything was all stitched out, I arranged the “windows” for assembly.

4 completed blocks Wildflower Window Cushion

When I assembled them, I decided to add a narrow strip of sashing between all 4 blocks, and around the outside. Once I put the envelope backing for the pillow on, I stitched about 1″ in from the edge to make a bit of a flange. I stuffed the project with an 18″ pillow. I used all scrap batik for the project, including the backing.

Sloppy photo...envelope back

Finished project with some mods

I figure overall, it took me about 12 hours to make this project, using up about 1 1/2 yards of scrap fabric. Fits just right in this rocking chair.

Finished Wildflower pillow

I loved the pattern so much, I stitched out 2 more blocks and made them into placemats for my friend, June, who lives in assisted living. I think they will make a nice Mother’s day gift for her, and replace the fall placemats that are currently on her table.

Placemat for June

All the fabrics came from the scrap bins and June’s box of fabric. I had fun with the variegated thread on the flower edges.

2nd Placemat for June

The fabric for the borders and backing were leftover twill from making a couple of aprons last year. I thik they will make great “reversible” placemats.

Back of Junes placemats
backside of June’s placemat

I think I got my monies worth for the pattern and used up some scraps as well. I’m counting a total of 1 yard of fabric “out” for the Stashbuster 2022 challenge.

Tally up for the #STASHBUSTER 2022 Challenge – 2 1/2 yards out for the month. Nothing new in. Cumulative 16 1/2 yards out, year to date.

Are you having any fun with machine embroidery or the Stashbuster challenge?

12 thoughts on “Wildflower Windows

    • Thanks. I’ve really enjoyed this embroidery machine, and think I am getting my “money’s” worth on the purchase of it. I really like these in the hoop projects that look so complex, but are essentially very easy. One takeaway from the last two projects is how the addition of a square of batting between the stabilizer and the top fabric eliminate any of the puckering that happens in dense stitching. Took the placemats to June yesterday, and she liked them. Had to remove “Autumn Jubilee” placemats from her table and put these pretty spring ones down. πŸ™‚

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  1. Thanks for sharing your project and the time it takes. I have done a few of SW’s projects and enjoy them. It is always way more time consuming than what they say!!!!

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    • I think it depends on the block size, and the thread changes and trims. If you are on a 16 needle, you still have to stop, lay down the applique and then stop & trim. I tried to keep close track on the actual stitching time and “start to finish’ time. πŸ™‚ I’ve done several of their projects and just love the end results.

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  2. I agree. What I like is that you get a really great product at the end! It’s certainly faster than a lot of my quilting projects. Getting my monies worth out of that used machine!!

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